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CHOICES - page 29
CHAPTER NINE - NAUSEA & LOSS OF APPETITE (continued)
4 mg. of Decadron (a steroid)and 40 mg. of Reglan (an antiemetic). The three medicines are compounded into a topical gel or suppositories. The combination is effective and fast-acting for many people. The gel is portable and easy to use. It can be taken any where and discreetly applied where and when needed.
        Insurance may not pay for BDR because it has not been approved in this form. Your doctor can prescribe each component separately and instruct the pharmacist to mix them.

Lifestyle considerations
        Instead of scheduling three big meals each day, it may be better to eat several small meals. That may require taking food along on trips or visits.
        Small containers of applesauce, pudding and cheese-and-cracker snacks are available at most supermarkets, usually in the section for school lunches. Trail mix, nuts or health bars can be stashed in the glove compartment or "survival" bag in the car. Your survival bag should also have ginger cookies and anti-nausea medicine, along with your pain medicine.
        When you eat out, you and your partner may decide to split one entree instead of ordering two full meals. Sometimes an appetizer makes a meal.
        Or you can take part of the meal home for an easy lunch the next day.
        If you don't feel like eating at all, you may want to set a timer to remind you to eat something, even if it is only a snack or glass of juice. This may prevent missing meals due to tiredness or lethargy. Having something to eat, however small, may restore your energy and even make you ready to eat something more substantial.
        Simple foods may be more appealing and easier to digest than spicy or fatty foods. They may also be easier for your caregiver to prepare. Don't try to live up to other people's expectation. Friends may want to show their affection by preparing your once- favorite foods. Explain that your tastes have changed: Forcing yourself to eat what your body does not want will cause nausea and vomiting.
        To prevent nausea, take smaller portions on a small plate. If the sight of food makes you nauseated, look at a picture on the wall or leave the table until the feeling passes. Get a prescription for anti-nausea medication, such as the gel. Take the medication with you wherever you go, especially when you go out to eat.
        Remember, eat what you want, when you want it.

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This information is provided for educational purposes only and does not replace or amend professional medical advice. Unless otherwise stated and credited, the content of Phoenix5 (P5) is by and the opinion of and copyright © 2000 Robert Vaughn Young. All Rights Reserved. P5 is at <http://www.phoenix5.org>. P5's policy regarding privacy and right to reprint are at <www.phoenix5.org/infopolicy>.